Index

Sunday

Soup Recipes From Use Net

Use your Browser back arrow to return from menu
SUMMER ASPARAGUS SOUP
ASPARAG-SOUP-1 — A light and simple asparagus soup
Every summer, it seems, the grocery stores are glutted with cheap asparagus. Most of the classical recipes for asparagus soup produce a hearty winter-style soup. Here's a simple recipe for a delicious, light, thin soup that is more in keeping with the time of the year that the glut occurs. You can leave out the chicken broth to make it a meatless soup, but it does require egg yolks.
INGREDIENTS (Serves 4–6)
2 Tbsp butter
1 onion, chopped
1½ lbs fresh asparagus
2 Tbsp flour
6 cups boiling water
2 tsp salt
¼ cup rich chicken broth (optional)
2 egg yolks
½ cup milk
PROCEDURE
(1) Melt the butter in a pan big enough to cook the soup. Sauté the onions for a few minutes, until transparent but not brown.
(2) Meanwhile, slice the asparagus into thin slices. Now add the sliced asparagus pieces to the onions and continue to sauté (over medium to medium-high heat) for 15 minutes, until most of the moisture has steamed out of the asparagus and the mixture has just barely started to brown.
(3) Add the flour to the onion/asparagus mixture and stir well to coat each piece with some flour. Cook for 2 or 3 more minutes over medium-high heat.
(4) Dump the boiling water into the asparagus mixture. Add the (optional) chicken broth and the salt. Simmer for 1 hour.
(5) Strain out the cooked asparagus, leaving behind a thin yellow-green soup.
(6) Thicken the soup with the 2 egg yolks. Add the milk and reheat the soup to serving temperature. Add salt and fresh-ground white pepper to taste. Serve immediately.
NOTES
The slicing disk on a food processor does an excellent job of slicing the asparagus for this recipe. You can use a food mill, a china cap, or an ordinary sieve to strain the cooked asparagus out of the broth. Don't try to make this soup as a low-salt soup by leaving out the salt. It will taste like dishwater if you cook the asparagus for an hour without salt. Don't try to skimp on time by leaving the cooked asparagus in the broth unstrained. It will ruin the texture.
RATING
Difficulty: easy to moderate (thickening soup with egg yolks is not a beginner's skill). Time: 10 minutes preparation, 1 hour simmering, 5 minutes finishing. Precision: Approximate measurement OK.
CONTRIBUTOR
Brian Reid
DEC Western Research Laboratory, Palo Alto, California, USA
reid@decwrl.dec.com decvax,sun,ucbvax,cbosgd,pyramid!decwrl!reid

Approved: reid@decwrl.dec.com

© Copyright (C) 1988 USENET Community Trust
Permission to copy without fee all or part of this material is granted provided that the copies are not made or distributed for direct commercial advantage, the USENET copyright notice and the title of the newsgroup and its date appear, and notice is given that copying is by permission of the USENET Community Trust or the original contributor.
BEER & CHEESE SOUP
BEER-CHS-SOUP — an easy quick tummy-warming soup
One of my favorite cold-weather soups, this recipe came from a friend of a friend of a friend. The listed vegetables are really just suggestions. Use whatever suits your fancy, or is in the refrigerator.
INGREDIENTS (Serves 6)
1 cup diced onions
1 cup diced celery
1 cup diced carrots
1 cup diced mushrooms
¾ cup butter
½ cup flour
1 tsp dry mustard
5 cups chicken or vegetable stock
1 bunch broccoli
11 oz beer (use a can or bottle and save a swallow for the cook!)
6 oz cheddar cheese, grated
2 Tbsp grated parmesan cheese
salt
pepper
PROCEDURE
(1) Sauté the diced vegetables in butter.
(2) Mix flour and mustard into sautéd vegetables. Add the chicken or vegetable stock to mixture and cook for five minutes.
(3) Break broccoli into small flowerets; cut stems into bite-sizes pieces. Steam until tender-crisp.
(4) Add beer and cheeses to the soup. Simmer 10–15 minutes. Check seasonings.
(5) To serve, place some broccoli into a soup bowl and ladle the soup over it.
NOTES
Because of the cheese, this soup doesn't survive a night in the refrigerator very well.
RATING
Difficulty: Easy. Time: 30 minutes. Precision: Approximate measurement OK.
CONTRIBUTOR
Moira Mallison
Tektronix, Inc. Beaverton, Oregon, USA
tektronix!moiram

Approved: reid@decwrl.UUCP

© Copyright (C) 1987 USENET Community Trust
Permission to copy without fee all or part of this material is granted provided that the copies are not made or distributed for direct commercial advantage, the USENET copyright notice and the title of the newsgroup and its date appear, and notice is given that copying is by permission of the USENET Community Trust or the original contributor.
CREAM OF BROCCOLI SOUP
BROCCOLI-SOUP — Addictive broccoli soup
This rich soup is a real flavor treat for everyone, even for people who don't normally eat broccoli. It can be served as the only course in a light meal. The soup is at its best when served with hot, hard French finger rolls and freshly squeezed cool orange juice. It is my own original recipe. You will not have tried it anywhere else except at my house. Enjoy.
INGREDIENTS (serves 4–6)
2 bunches, fresh broccoli (each about 3 in bottom diameter, banded)
½ lb butter
2–6 cloves of fresh garlic, chopped fine. (Use less or more to taste.)
1 Tbsp chervil (fresh or dried, finely chopped)
1 tsp salt
1 tsp white pepper
3 cups milk (use full-cream milk (homogenized))
1 medium egg yolk, beaten
¼ cup flour (no lumps)
1/8 tsp cardamom
1/8 tsp mace
1 cup heavy cream ("whipping" cream preferred)
1/3 cup Gruyere cheese (fresh, grated fine)
1/3 cup parmesan cheese (fresh, grated to powder)
PROCEDURE
(1) Cut broccoli into bite-size pieces. Discard the hard stem pieces, but keep tender leaves and stem parts.
(2) Steam the cut broccoli for about 5–8 minutes, until just bright green in color. Do not overcook.
(3) In a 10-inch enameled (non-metal) skillet, heat 6 oz of butter until melted. Add chopped garlic and wait until butter is hot enough to cook in. Add steamed broccoli, then chervil to the skillet. Lightly salt the broccoli.
(4) Cover, and cook over medium low heat, stirring occasionally with a wooden spoon, for another 5–10 minutes or until the broccoli turns a darker green color and becomes very soft.
(5) Mash the broccoli right in the skillet until no large pieces remain. Use a potato masher or a strong wooden spoon. Mash until there are no pieces remaining that are too big to fit in a soup spoon.
(6) While broccoli is cooking, add beaten egg yolk to 2 cups of milk.
(7) Put 3 Tbsp butter into a 2–3 quart saucepan. Use enamel or glass for best soup flavor. Metal pans will make this soup bitter. Melt butter and add flour. When the flour bubbles and starts to cook, add the egg/milk mixture into the saucepan. Add the cardamom, mace, and white pepper. Stir contents of saucepan constantly with wooden spoon until thick. Lower the cooking heat.
(8) Empty the mashed broccoli mixture into the saucepan. Stir until well-mixed. Slowly stir in the remaining milk and the cream. As soon as the soup becomes hot enough to cook again, add the grated cheeses.
(9) Turn the heat down lower and simmer for about 5 more minutes, stirring to allow the cheeses to melt and mix while the table is being set. Serve immediately and retire quickly so as not to be trampled by those who smelled it cooking.
NOTES
This recipe may be doubled, halved or whatever without penalty. Vary the amount of milk added the second time to change the soup thickness to your own tastes. You also may use any fresh green vegetable as a substitute for the broccoli. Asparagus tips, artichoke hearts, and corn are especially nice. Cook them in the same way as you did the broccoli. Use any leftover butter on the hard French finger rolls. Warning: This soup is a mild aphrodisiac when served as suggested and by candlelight. Use Bailey's Irish Cream as a chaser.
RATING
Difficulty: moderate. Time: 30 minutes.
CONTRIBUTOR
George Robertson
Fort Worth, Texas
Approved: reid@decwrl.UUCP

© Copyright (C) 1986 USENET Community Trust
Permission to copy without fee all or part of this material is granted provided that the copies are not made or distributed for direct commercial advantage, the USENET copyright notice and the title of the newsgroup and its date appear, and notice is given that copying is by permission of the USENET Community Trust or the original contributor.
PUMPKIN CHEESE SOUP
CHEESE-SOUP1 — Cheese soup in a pumpkin shell
This recipe came from the 1983 Half Moon Bay Pumpkin Festival, and was published in our local newspaper in 1984.
INGREDIENTS (Serves 6)
1 pumpkin (big enough to hold 6–10 servings of soup)
2 Tbsp butter, melted
2 Tbsp butter
1 large onion, chopped
2 large carrots, shredded
2 celery sticks, chopped
4 cups vegetable broth
1 garlic clove, minced
¼ tsp salt
¼ tsp pepper
¼ tsp nutmeg
¾ cup light cream
1 cup cheddar or gruyere cheese, grated
1/3 cup dry white wine
2 Tbsp parsley, minced
PROCEDURE
(1) Preheat oven to 375º F. Butter a baking sheet.
(2) Prepare pumpkin: cut off the top, scoop out seeds, brush inside with 2 Tbsp melted butter. Replace top and place pumpkin on baking sheet. Bake 45 mins or until tender when pierced with a fork. The pumpkin should be a bit droopy but still hold its shape well.
(3) Meanwhile, melt 2 Tbsp butter in a big saucepan. Add onion, carrots, celery. Sauté until soft, about 10 mins. Add broth, garlic, salt, pepper, and nutmeg. Cover, and simmer 20 minutes. Cool slightly.
(4) Puree vegetable mixture in 2 or 3 batches in a blender or food processor. Put back in saucepan; stir in the cream. Reheat. Add cheese and wine, heat until cheese melts. Stir frequently after adding milk to avoid scorching.
(5) Place hot pumpkin on serving platter. Pour in soup. Sprinkle with parsley.
NOTES
Serve the soup by ladling out of the pumpkin at the table, scopping a little bit of pumpkin into each serving. The pumpkin then makes a great centerpiece for your table, while allowing people to have second helpings. I use half greyere and half cheddar. Shred the cheeses very finely so they will melt rapidly. After the soup is all gone, the pumpkin can be cut up, washed, and used in pumpkin pie. It may need more baking to become soft enough to puree for the pies.
It was impossible to find pumpkins after Halloween near San Francisco, but fortunately they keep for a month until Thanksgiving in a cool area if left uncut.
In North America, light cream is often called "half and half".
RATING
Difficulty: moderate. Time: 1 hour. Precision: approximate measurement OK.
CONTRIBUTOR
Judy Anderson
Lucid, Inc., Menlo Park, California, USA

Approved: reid@decwrl.dec.com

© Copyright (C) 1987 USENET Community Trust
Permission to copy without fee all or part of this material is granted provided that the copies are not made or distributed for direct commercial advantage, the USENET copyright notice and the title of the newsgroup and its date appear, and notice is given that copying is by permission of the USENET Community Trust or the original contributor.
CHICK-PEA SOUP
CHICKPEA-SOUP — Greek style chick-pea soup
I got this recipe from a Greek cookbook. It is the standard way of cooking chick peas in Greece.
INGREDIENTS (serves 4)
1 lb chick peas
2 Tbsp baking soda
3–4 small onions (chopped)
¾ cup olive oil
2 tsp salt
lemon juice
PROCEDURE
(1) Soak the chick peas in water overnight.
(2) Drain the chick peas and sprinkle the baking soda on them. Stir them a little and let them stand for one hour.
(3) Rinse the chick peas with plenty of water. Put them in a pot and cover them with water. Bring them to a boil, then lower heat to medium.
(4) Skim off the scum that forms on the surface, and then add the onions. Cover, and cook on low heat for about two hours or until the chick peas are soft. (If necessary, add some hot water into the pot while the chick peas are cooking).
(5) Add the olive oil and salt, and cook for a few more minutes.
(6) Serve with a dash of lemon juice, plenty of fresh bread and, if you like, a chunk of feta cheese on the side.
NOTES
At step 3 you're supposed to remove the skin off the chick peas. I was never able to do it (it comes off only with some difficulty, and you have to do it for each individual pea), but it doesn't seem to affect the dish adversely. You know that the soup is done when the chick peas begin to dissolve, making the soup rather thick. This might not give the dish a very attractive appearance, but the taste is an entirely different matter.
RATING
Difficulty: easy. Time: overnight soak, 2–3 hours cooking. Precision: no need to measure.
CONTRIBUTOR
Kriton Kyrimis
Princeton University, Computer Science Dept., Princeton, New Jersey, USA
Approved: reid@decwrl.dec.com

© Copyright (C) 1987 USENET Community Trust
Permission to copy without fee all or part of this material is granted provided that the copies are not made or distributed for direct commercial advantage, the USENET copyright notice and the title of the newsgroup and its date appear, and notice is given that copying is by permission of the USENET Community Trust or the original contributor.
FRUIT SOUP
FRUIT-SOUP — Fresh fruit soup
This is a simple, delicious soup, perfect for a hot summer day. It is based upon a recipe in The Moosewood Cookbook by Mollie Katzen. This describes what emerged last time I made it; vary any or all of the ingredients freely. I've included some suggestions at the end.
INGREDIENTS (serves 4)
12 oz apple juice concentrate (one can)
2 peaches or nectarines
1 wedge canteloupe
2 apricots
12 strawberries
1 small lemon
1 small lime
½ tsp dried mint flakes
cinnamon
nutmeg
2 cups unflavored yogurt
honey
sherry or other sweet wine
12 oz grape juice concentrate (one can)
4 violets or other small non-toxic flowers
PROCEDURE
(1) Wash and peel the peaches, canteloupe, and apricots. Wash and hull the strawberries and set aside the 4 nicest ones. Peaches and apricots peel more easily if you dip them in boiling water for a few seconds before peeling. Try not to lose any juice from the fruit.
(2) Put half of the fruit into the bowl of a food processor and purée. You could also use a food mill for this.
(3) Put the puréed fruit into a bowl and add the apple juice concentrate, an equal quantity of water, the juice of the lemon and of the lime, the mint flakes, a sprinkle each of cinnamon and nutmeg, and half of the yogurt. Whisk together well. Add several glugs of sherry and honey to taste. (It shouldn't be very sweet—a couple spoonfuls should do it.)
(4) Put the rest of the fruit in the food processor and pulse until well chopped but with recognizable chunks of fruit still visible. Put this into a different bowl and mix some of the first mixture into it so the fruit doesn't turn brown. Put both bowls in the refrigerator for at least half an hour.
(5) When you're ready to serve, divide the chunky fruit into 4 soup bowls. Fill each bowl almost to the rim with the soup. Pour the grape juice concentrate into a creamer or small pitcher and carefully pour two concentric circles of grape juice into each bowl. Take a chopstick or similar sized utensil and draw it through each bowl several times alternating from the center to the edge and from the edge to the center, lifting the chopstick after each stroke. This should turn the rings of grape juice into sort of a zigzag pattern. Stir up the remaining yogurt well and put a little mound of yogurt into each bowl. (The yogurt will probably sink. Put more in until you get a mound!) Take the 4 reserved strawberries, slice them thinly, and surround each mound of yogurt with strawberry slices. Top each mound of yogurt with a flower and get ready for the oohs and ahs.
NOTES
You can substitute any fruit that you want, but use strong tasting fruits like pineapple in moderation or they will take over the soup. Bananas are nice; cherries are wonderful but impossible to peel. Plums and other fruits with very mild flavors tend to get lost in the shuffle. The juice concentrates can be replaced with regular juices; vary them if you like, also. There's an apple-pear-grape juice combination that's delicious as the base and cranberry juice is nice as the contrasting color. Or, use a darker juice for the base and something lighter in color like orange juice to make the rings. Cherries or mint leaves make attractive garnishes. Of course you don't have to go through all the special presentation work, but it really doesn't take that much time and it makes the result into something special. Doing the fruit in two steps is strictly optional; if you're not going to make the ring pattern you may as well just process it all at once and stop before it's completely puréed.
RATING
Difficulty: moderate. Time: 20 minutes preparation, 30 minutes chilling, 10 minutes presentation. Precision: no need to measure.
CONTRIBUTOR
Paul Asente
Stanford University
asente@su-cascade.arpa decwrl!glacier!cascade!asente

Approved: reid@decwrl.UUCP

© Copyright (C) 1986 USENET Community Trust
Permission to copy without fee all or part of this material is granted provided that the copies are not made or distributed for direct commercial advantage, the USENET copyright notice and the title of the newsgroup and its date appear, and notice is given that copying is by permission of the USENET Community Trust or the original contributor.
PUMPKIN-MILLET SOUP
KABOCHA-SOUP — A hearty soup with millet and Japanese pumpkin
A delicious combination, this hearty soup makes a good side dish, and is great reheated for breakfast.
INGREDIENTS (Serves 4–6)
1 medium kabocha squash (also known as Japanese pumpkin)
6 cups broth (vegetable or chicken), or use water
1 cup dry millet
1–2 tsp nutmeg
1/8 tsp cayenne pepper
PROCEDURE
(1) Bring the broth to a boil in a large stock pot, add millet, and simmer for about 30 min, until millet is well cooked.
(2) Add squash, mix, and simmer for another 15-20 min, until squash is tender.
(3) Pureé the mixture in batches in a blender or food processor until it is reduced to a creamy texture.
(4) Add the nutmeg and pepper, and reheat.
(5) Serve with a scoop of yogurt in each bowl.
NOTES
Butternut squash makes a good substitute for kabocha if you cannot find it at your local market.
RATING
Difficulty: easy. Time: 60 minutes. Precision: approximate measurement OK; be careful with spices.
CONTRIBUTOR
Robert Blumen
EECS Department, University of California, Berkeley
blumen@cad.berkeley.edu
Approved: reid@decwrl.dec.com

© Copyright (C) 1987 USENET Community Trust
Permission to copy without fee all or part of this material is granted provided that the copies are not made or distributed for direct commercial advantage, the USENET copyright notice and the title of the newsgroup and its date appear, and notice is given that copying is by permission of the USENET Community Trust or the original contributor.
POTATO AND SPINACH SOUP
SPUD-SPIN-SOUP — A rich cream-style potato and spinach soup for a cold winter day
This recipe is one that the U.S. Department of Agriculture used to distribute to potato growers in the 1930's. It is rich and thick, almost a meal in itself, and is very easy to make.
INGREDIENTS (serves 4)
½ cup chopped fresh onion
2 Tbsp butter
2 cups water
1 tsp salt
2 cups potatoes (about 1 pound of raw potatoes)
2 cups cooked chopped spinach (Fresh or frozen)
13 oz evaporated milk (one standard can)
1 tsp Worcestershire sauce
1/2 lb grated cheese (cheddar and Swiss work best, but any kind will do)
PROCEDURE
(1) In a 3-quart saucepan, sauté the onion in the butter until the onion is translucent (about 3 minutes).
(2) Add water, potatoes, spinach, and salt. Cook until potatoes are tender (about 20 minutes). Longer cooking does not hurt, but turn down the heat to a simmer.
(3) Add milk and Worcestershire sauce. Reheat to near boiling, but do not boil.
(4) Stir in grated cheese. Serve immediately.
RATING
Difficulty: easy. Time: 30 minutes. Precision: no need to measure.
CONTRIBUTOR
Kathy Wright
Harris Computer Systems, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
Approved: reid@glacier.ARPA

© Copyright (C) 1986 USENET Community Trust
Permission to copy without fee all or part of this material is granted provided that the copies are not made or distributed for direct commercial advantage, the USENET copyright notice and the title of the newsgroup and its date appear, and notice is given that copying is by permission of the USENET Community Trust or the original contributor.
TORTILLA SOUP
TORTILLA-SOUP — A spicy soup with cheese, tomatoes, and corn
This is a recipe from Salmagundi, a San Francisco soup restaurant chain.
INGREDIENTS (Serves 12)
3 lbs chicken pieces
16 cups water
1 tsp celery seed
1 tsp black peppercorns
2 garlic cloves, peeled
1 lb canned whole peeled tomatoes (do not drain—reserve the liquid)
1 onion, cut into ½-inch pieces.
1 green pepper, cut into ½-inch pieces.
3 sprigs fresh cilantro
½ tsp ground cumin
¼ tsp cayenne or chili powder
¼ tsp ground white pepper
1 clove garlic, minced
10 oz frozen corn
4 green onions, coarsely chopped
salt
1 cup cooked rice (cook 3 oz of raw rice to get that much cooked rice)
2 tsp minced parsley
4 oz tortilla chips
½ lb grated cheddar cheese
PROCEDURE
(1) Combine chicken and water in stockpot. Add celery seed, peppercorns and garlic tied in cheesecloth. Cover, bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer for about 45 minutes.
(2) Remove chicken from broth and let cool. Strain broth and return to pot.
(3) Add tomatoes, onion, green pepper, cilantro, cumin, cayenne, white pepper and garlic. Cover and simmer 30 minutes.
(4) Add corn and green onion. Simmer 10 minutes. While this is cooking, skin and bone the chicken pieces and cut the meat into bite-size pieces.
(5) Add salt to taste. Add the chicken, rice and parsley to the broth, and heat through.
(6) Garnish each bowl with a few crisp tortilla chips (homemade are best, or those made in a homemade style) and some grated cheddar cheese.
NOTES
I usually make this with leftover chicken. You don't actually need a whole chicken worth—even a small amount will do. In this case, I use a mixture of chicken broth and water (about 2/3 chicken broth) for the liquid.
RATING
Difficulty: easy. Time: 2 hours, most of it simmering. Precision: approximate measurement OK.
CONTRIBUTOR
Vicki O'Day
Hewlett-Packard Laboratories, Palo Alto CA
hplabs!oday
Approved: reid@decwrl.UUCP

© Copyright (C) 1986 USENET Community Trust
Permission to copy without fee all or part of this material is granted provided that the copies are not made or distributed for direct commercial advantage, the USENET copyright notice and the title of the newsgroup and its date appear, and notice is given that copying is by permission of the USENET Community Trust or the original contributor.
WINTER VEGETABLE SOUP
VEG-SOUP-1 — A rich vegetable soup for cold weather
I submitted this recipe to a local paper for a cooking contest a few winters back. The recipe won an honorable mention in the Staten Island Advance. I make it at least twice a winter. It is very rich, and something my family looks forward to.
INGREDIENTS (Serves 4)
1 leek, chopped
1 large onion, chopped
4 carrots, chopped
1 bunch watercress, chopped
½ lb butter
1 large blanched tomato, chopped
4 celery stalks, chopped
½ cup fresh mushrooms, sliced
½ cup heavy cream
salt
black pepper
white pepper
PROCEDURE
(1) In a large saucepan, combine the butter, leeks, carrots, onions, celery, and spices. Cover with water and simmer until the vegetables are tender.
(2) When vegetables are tender, place ¾ of the contents of the saucepan into a blender and puree until creamy. Pour contents back into the saucepan.
(3) Add cream, chopped tomatoes, mushrooms, and watercress. Season to taste with salt, black pepper, and white pepper. Simmer for 10 more minutes. Serve with french crusty bread and enjoy!
RATING
Difficulty: easy. Time: 10 minutes preparation, 45 minutes cooking. Precision: no need to measure.
CONTRIBUTOR
V. Snyder
AT&T Information Systems, Lincroft NJ

Approved: reid@decwrl.UUCP

© Copyright (C) 1986 USENET Community Trust
Permission to copy without fee all or part of this material is granted provided that the copies are not made or distributed for direct commercial advantage, the USENET copyright notice and the title of the newsgroup and its date appear, and notice is given that copying is by permission of the USENET Community Trust or the original contributor.
WATERCRESS SOUP
WATERCRESSSOUP — Watercress soup, hot or cold
This thick, creamy soup is equally good whether served hot or cold. I have had watercress soup in restaurants, and my mother sometimes makes it, too, but this recipe is my own interpretation of the idea.
INGREDIENTS (Serves 4)
1 bunch watercress
1/2 onion (medium sized, coarsely chopped.)
1 potato (medium sized, roughly diced.)
(chopped)
1/2 oz butter (or your favourite oil or margarine)
3 cups water
1 Tbsp heavy cream (Whipping cream is roughly the same thing)
1 oz black caviar (lump fish roe is fine.)
4 water biscuits (bite size)
pinch salt and pepper (to taste)
PROCEDURE
(1) Gently fry onion and garlic in a small amount of butter until transparent.
(2) Season lightly with salt and pepper, and add water and potato and boil until soft.
(3) Pick over watercress and chop 4 or five sprigs and set them aside. Puré the onion mixture in a blender. Add most of watercress, blend, re-season to taste and return to heat.
(4) Bring mixture to boil and simmer for 2 or three minutes. Stir gently to prevent soup from sticking to bottom. Remove from heat.
This is the decision point. Either set aside to cool, then chill, or carry on to serve the soup hot.
(5) Stir in cream and chopped watercress. Heap a teaspoon of caviar on each of the water biscuits and float one on each bowl of soup immediately prior to serving.
NOTES
Use the minimum amount of butter, oil, or margarine that will turn the onion transparent. Those who are particularly diet-conscious could dispense with this step, and with the cream. Don't overdo the garlic, 1/2 a small clove is ample since it is a background flavour, not one that you should be aware of. A caution regarding seasoning. Potatoes absorb a lot of salt so you may find it undersalted. The caviar on the other hand, is very salty. This, for me, is a delightful and important contrast. Guests can always add extra salt if they choose.
Water biscuits are made by Carr's, amongst others, and can be found in most supermarkets, possibly in the gourmet food section. They are variously known as water biscuits, water crackers and table water crackers. To my mind the best for eating with cheese are the high-bake ones, but the regular type are better for this recipe. If you can't find them, then any round dry bland low-salt cracker will do.
A 2 oz jar of lumpfish caviar costs a little under $3.00, but it does keep in the fridge so you can get two batches of four servings from one jar. I suppose if budget is a prime consideration one could dispense with the caviar, too, but that would be like serving a martini without the olives.
RATING
Difficulty: easy to moderate. Time: 20 minutes of preparation, 1/2 hour of simmering. Precision: Approximate measurement OK.
CONTRIBUTOR
Marcus G Hand.
AT&T Information Systems, Holmdel NJ

WIGILIA-7 — Almond Soup
This recipe could be used as part of a 12 course meal known in Polish as Wigilia, or on its own. Wigilia is eaten after sundown on Christmas Eve.
INGREDIENTS (Serves 6–8)
5 cups milk
½ lb blanched almonds, finely ground
1 tsp almond extract
2 cups cooked rice
1/3 cup sugar
¼ cup raisins or currants
PROCEDURE
(1) Heat milk just to simmerring in a large saucepan.
(2) Add all the ingredients; stir until well mixed. Cook over low heat 3 to 5 minutes.
(3) Serve hot as is traditional for Christmas, or chill before serving.
RATING
Difficulty: easy. Time: ½ hour. Precision: Approximate measurement OK.
CONTRIBUTOR
Original recipe passed down through the generations and
translated from Polish into English (with a few mods) by
Edward Chrzanowski
MFCF, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada
echrzanowski@watmath.waterloo.edu or ihnp4,allegra,utzoo!watmath!echrzanowski

Approved: reid@decwrl.dec.com

No comments:

Post a Comment