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ADVOKAAT
ADVOKAAT — Egg-cognac: a potent sweet alcoholic beverage
Advokaat is the Dutch word for "egg cognac". It is highly recommended for A. I. (Alcohol Imbibing) meetings. This recipe is my modification of a recipe I obtained in Poland. It makes a potent, superb advokaat (or egg-cognac). The milk and eggs are healthy, the sugar and alcohol are not.
INGREDIENTS (Serves 4–8)
1½ cups sugar
2 Tbsp vanilla sugar
2 cups milk
9 egg yolks
1½ cups 95% grain alcohol
PROCEDURE
(1) Mix sugars.
(2) Boil milk with half of sugars for two minutes. Let it cool down. (For the milk it is easiest to use a pot which can later be used with a mixer.)
(3) Mix well (mixer at high speed) the yolks with the other half of the sugars.
(4) Using mixer add to milk. Then (still using mixer) add alcohol slowly. (The result is quite fluid, sweet and strong.)
(5) Bottle and let rest for two weeks to let the mixture thicken.
NOTES
This advokaat can be drunk or, better yet, eaten with a spoon: it is quite thick.
RATING
Difficulty: easy. Time: 5 minutes preparation, 2 weeks aging. Precision: Measure the ingredients.
CONTRIBUTOR
Laurent Siklóssy
Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
siklossy@cs.vu.nl
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© Copyright (C) 1988 USENET Community Trust
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GRANDMA'S SWINGIN' EGGNOG
EGGNOG1 — A potent holiday party eggnog drink
Eggnog is a traditional holiday party drink. This recipe makes a rich and powerful eggnog.
INGREDIENTS (Serves 20)
6 egg yolks
1/2 cup sugar (white granulated)
2 cups milk
2 cups light rum
2 cups whipping cream
PROCEDURE
(1) Beat yolks until light. Add sugar and mix well. Add milk and rum. Mix well, then chill for at least 3 hours.
(2) One hour before serving, whip cream and stir into chilled mixture. Return to refrigerator for an hour.
(3) Serve in punch cups and dust with nutmeg.
NOTES
This stuff is POTENT, even if you reduce the rum by half. Brandy, dark rum or bourbon may be substituted for the light rum. If you prefer a nonalcoholic eggnog, leave out the booze altogether. With or without booze, this eggnog is very rich, and very good.
RATING
Difficulty: easy. Time: 5 minutes preparation, 3 or more hours cooling. Precision: approximate measurement OK.
CONTRIBUTOR
Suzanne Barnett- Scott
Calcomp Sauders Display Products Division, Scottsdale, Arizona
terak!suze
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© Copyright (C) 1986 USENET Community Trust
Permission to copy without fee all or part of this material is granted provided that the copies are not made or distributed for direct commercial advantage, the USENET copyright notice and the title of the newsgroup and its date appear, and notice is given that copying is by permission of the USENET Community Trust or the original contributor.
HOPKINS NEOLITHIC EGG NOG
EGGNOG2 — Traditional layered eggnog with bourbon and dark rum
This is the egg nog that was served at the Hopkins Neolithic Xmas Party, a party that some friends used to have every year. We now serve it for our Winter Solstice celebration. It's purported to come from the original Fanny Farmer Cookbook.
INGREDIENTS (Serves 15–20, inebriates 6)
12 egg whites
½ cup sugar
12 egg yolks
1 cup sugar
¼ tsp salt
4 cups heavy cream, beaten
4 cups milk
4 cups Bourbon
1 cup dark rum e.g., Myers's Rum
PROCEDURE
(1) Beat whites stiff; beat in ½ cup sugar.
(2) Beat yolks until very light with 1 cup sugar, and salt.
(3) Combine and stir until thoroughly blended.
(4) Add cream, then milk, then Bourbon.
(5) Beat well.
(6) Add rum.
(7) Store in a cold cellar for a week.
NOTES
Serve with freshly-grated nutmeg. The egg nog should be ladled from the bottom of the bowl, and never stirred, in order to maintain its layered quality. An alternate method, preferred by some, is to make a creamy, non- layered egg nog by stirring gently every day.
RATING
Difficulty: easy. Time: 5–10 minutes preparation; 1 week aging. Precision: Approximate measurement OK.
CONTRIBUTOR
Ed Gould
mt Xinu, Berkeley, California, USA
ucbvax,decvax!mtxinu! ed
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© Copyright (C) 1986 USENET Community Trust
Permission to copy without fee all or part of this material is granted provided that the copies are not made or distributed for direct commercial advantage, the USENET copyright notice and the title of the newsgroup and its date appear, and notice is given that copying is by permission of the USENET Community Trust or the original contributor.
MO'S ANCESTRAL EGGNOG
EGGNOG3 — Wonderful eggnog
[I got this recipe from net.cooks back in 1982. It was posted by Mike O'Dell (known around the network as "mo"). I have made it for the last two Christmases, and find it quite good. The recipe is basically as he posted it. I have added a few comments in brackets. Apparently he served it at a party at LBL-CSAM that year.] This wonderful formula was handed down to me from my grandmother, who got it from her mother and grandmother. I heartily recommend it as a superior lubricant for the festive season.
INGREDIENTS (Makes about 16 cups)
12 eggs, separated
1 lb confectioner's sugar
2 cups liquor
8 cups heavy whipping cream
1–2 tsp nutmeg
½ cup sugar
PROCEDURE
(1) Separate the 12 eggs. Set the whites aside in the 'fridge, tightly covered for safety, as they won't be needed until much later.
(2) Beat the yolks until they noticeably lighten in color. From here on out, an industrial-strength mixer (Kitchen-Aid K5, for instance) is a big help. [Being at my in-laws, I was forced to use a little GE hand mixer. It worked fine.]
(3) Continue beating the yolks while adding the confectioner's sugar.
(4) Beat for about 4 minutes or until the mixture turns much lighter yellow and takes on a satin-like texture.
(5) While still beating, slowly add 2 cups liquor. [If you decide you need more, this is NOT where you put it in.]
(6) After the liquor is thoroughly beaten in, cover the mixture with plastic wrap or aluminum foil and let it stand for 1 hour at room temperature. This is to "cook" the eggs and takes much longer if you refrigerate. [I lay plastic wrap right down on top of the mixture to avoid any possible "skin" that might form.]
(7) After standing, add the heavy whipping cream, unwhipped! You could try whipping it first, but again, you are on your own.
(8) Add the nutmeg. OPTION: At this point, the original recipe calls for adding an additional 2–4 cups of liquor, but I omitted this as it passed a taste-test as-is. If you want your 'Nog a LOT stronger, have at it, but please taste before you pour.
(9) Mix thoroughly, again.
(10) Refrigerate the mixture for 3 hours to let it ripen. I use two large juice containers. It splits nicely between them and will fit in our 'fridge. [Overnight is good, if you're making it for, say, Christmas day, but see the safety note below if you intend to let it sit overnight.]
(11) At the end of the 3 hours, remember where you put the egg whites. Beat them until stiff but not dry, adding about ½ cup sugar to slightly sweeten the whites. N.B.: 12 egg whites whip into quite a mass, so be prepared. [You can also whip them 6 at a time. This is probably a very good idea if you're doing it in a Kitchenaid, since 12 might overflow the bowl.]
(12) Assembly instructions. Pour the whites into the serving bowl you will be using. Then gently and slowly pour the other mixture into the bowl, mixing with a whisk to fold it all together. The whites should be smoothly and evenly distributed through the 'Nog to make it fluffy. They will lose some of their bulk so don't be afraid to mix thoroughly. Sprinkle the top with some more nutmeg, and serve. A shaker of nutmeg by the bowl is a nice touch for those wanting a shake on their own mugful. [The first time I made this recipe, I had to keep restirring the mixture. The only difference I can think of is that the second time I didn't add sugar to the egg whites.]
NOTES
[This makes a large amount of eggnog. Last year I made a half recipe, which sufficed for the 10 or so people we had then. This year I made the whole thing, and 16 people left some over (some of them don't drink, though).] Powered sugar will do nicely, and even granulated would probably work if you beat long enough. [I'm not sure about the difference between confectioner's sugar and powdered sugar. Maybe they were different in the old days?—SWT] [Confectioner's sugar and powdered sugar are regional names for the same product—BKR]
For the liquor, use bourbon, rum, vodka, Canadian blended, or whatever you like. Being a bourbon fan, I used that in the batch for the CSAM party. The others should work but I haven't tried them. Depending on taste, you may want more than this. [I used rum the times I made it.]
[Note from the editor: eggwhites are extremely susceptible to bacterial infection. If you intend to make this eggnog ahead of time, to let it stand longer than the 3 hours suggested, do not store the separated eggwhites and then blend them in at the last moment. If you want perfection in overnight eggnog, then discard the whites from the separated eggs, and crack and separate 12 new eggs in the morning and use their whites. If you want economy in overnight eggnog, then fold the eggwhites into the alcohol mixture before storing it overnight.—BKR]
RATING
Difficulty: moderate. Time: ½ hour preparation, 3 hours waiting. Precision: no need to measure.
CONTRIBUTOR
Enjoy!!!
-Mike O'Dell
Arlington, Virginia
Reposted and annotated by Spencer W. Thomas:
(ihnp4,decvax!utah-cs! thomas, thomas@utah-cs.ARPA)
Salt Lake City, Utah

© Copyright (C) 1986 USENET Community Trust
Permission to copy without fee all or part of this material is granted provided that the copies are not made or distributed for direct commercial advantage, the USENET copyright notice and the title of the newsgroup and its date appear, and notice is given that copying is by permission of the USENET Community Trust or the original contributor.
MANGO MILK SHAKE
MANGO-SHAKE — A refreshing Indian summer drink
This is a delicious, refreshing, and easy-to-make drink for hot summer days.
INGREDIENTS (6 12-oz drinks)
1 lb mango pulp (See note)
6 cups whole milk
3 Tbsp sugar
12 ice cubes
PROCEDURE
(1) Put half of the mango pulp, 3 cups of milk, 1½ Tbsp of sugar, and 6 ice cubes into the blender. Blend until smooth. Serve.
(2) Repeat step 1, quickly, as people will already be asking for more.
NOTES
Canned mango pulp is available in Indian and Latin American grocery stores. The "mango nectar" that is widely available in American grocery stores does not have nearly enough mangoes per unit volume to make this drink. If you are lucky enough to be able to get fresh mangoes, you can use the flesh of one ripe mango for about 1 cup of the mango pulp; if you do that, increase the amount of sugar to 2 Tbsp per batch, as canned mango pulp always has added sugar. You can make interesting variations on this recipe by using plain yogurt for some or all of the milk, and by adding a tart counterbalance to the mangoes, such as shredded kiwifruit.
RATING
Difficulty: trivial. Time: 3 minutes. Precision: no need to measure ingredients.
CONTRIBUTOR
Ratna Sarkar
Graduate School of Business, Stanford University, Palo Alto CA
c/o JLH.Vivek@SU- Sierra.ARPA
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EASY MARGARITAS
MARGARITA-1 — Vodka margaritas
INGREDIENTS (Serves 3–4)
6 oz frozen limeade
6 oz vodka
6 oz water
ice
PROCEDURE
(1) Blend equal parts of limeade, vodka, and water in a blender.
(2) Add ice, and blend to slushiness desired. More ice makes it slushier.
NOTES
Officially, a margarita calls for tequila instead of the vodka, with a splash of triple sec. No one notices the absence of the triple sec and many people prefer the taste of vodka.
RATING
Difficulty: trivial. Time: 2 minutes. Precision: use equal measures of the ingredients.
CONTRIBUTOR
Patricia Boren
The Rand Corporation, Santa Monica CA
decvax!randvax! boren
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© Copyright (C) 1986 USENET Community Trust
Permission to copy without fee all or part of this material is granted provided that the copies are not made or distributed for direct commercial advantage, the USENET copyright notice and the title of the newsgroup and its date appear, and notice is given that copying is by permission of the USENET Community Trust or the original contributor.
HOT RUM TODDY
RUM-TODDY — Ultimate hot buttered rum recipe
I started making hot buttered rum from a Trader Vic recipe 15 years ago, and I have gradually evolved it by adding more spices, more butter, and less rum. The way you make a hot buttered rum is to add some "batter" to some rum, and heat it. I like to keep a made-up batch of the batter in the refrigerator in an old margarine tub. For parties I make up a fresh batch.
INGREDIENTS (Serves 12)
1 lb dark brown sugar
½ lb salted butter
1 tsp ground nutmeg
1 tsp ground cinnamon
1 tsp ground cloves
1 tsp ground white cardamom
750 ml top-quality dark rum (A standard "fifth" bottle, 750 ml, will serve 12)
PROCEDURE
(1) Put all batter ingredients (everything but the rum) in a food processor and run it until the mixture turns creamy. Fold it down once with a rubber spatula to make sure the spices are blended in, and run the food processor some more.
(2) Scoop the mixture into a plastic container, and refrigerate. It will keep for many months in the refrigerator, even though it contains butter.
PROCEDURE
(1) Fill a coffee mug half full of boiling water. The easiest way to do this is to put a mug of hot water in the microwave. If you don't have a microwave, then fill the mug with boiling water, pour it out, then fill it half full of boiling water.
(2) Add 2 generous tablespoons of batter. Stir until the batter dissolves in the hot water. I use a small wire whisk for this stirring.
(3) Add 2 jiggers (3 oz) of the best rum you can afford. When I make this in quantities for parties I like to use Myers Dark Rum.
NOTES
One theory of hot-toddy making is that it is impossible to use too much batter and you should keep stirring more in until you are bored with stirring. Another theory of hot-toddy making is that it is impossible to use too much rum, and that you should keep stirring in more until your friends panic.
RATING
Difficulty: easy. Time: 5 minutes. Precision: no need to measure.
CONTRIBUTOR
Brian Reid
DEC Western Research Laboratory, Palo Alto, CA
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© Copyright (C) 1986 USENET Community Trust
Permission to copy without fee all or part of this material is granted provided that the copies are not made or distributed for direct commercial advantage, the USENET copyright notice and the title of the newsgroup and its date appear, and notice is given that copying is by permission of the USENET Community Trust or the original contributor.

SHERBET AND GINGER ALE PUNCH
SHERBET-PUNCH — A non- alcoholic party punch recipe
This is a super non- alcoholic punch with lots of possible variations.
INGREDIENTS (16 cups of punch)
½ gallon sherbet (use your favorite flavor or one that complements the occasion)
2 quarts ginger ale
PROCEDURE
(1) Scoop sherbet into punch bowl. Slowly pour ginger ale over the sherbet.
(2) Serve.
(3) Replenish sherbet and/or ginger ale as needed.
NOTES
Different sherbet flavors or mixtures of flavors make for many variations. I once made a variation that replaced ½ of the ginger ale with lemonade. Super!
RATING
Difficulty: very easy. Time: 2 minutes. Precision: no need to measure.
CONTRIBUTOR
Suzanne Barnett- Scott
Calcomp/Sanders Display Products, Scottsdale AZ
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DOUBLE STOUT
STOUT-DOUBLE — Double stout beer
I would not recommend making this as your first beer, but if you are into brewing, and like a strong stout, then give this one a try. Don't be in a hurry to drink it, though, it really benefits from a long aging. I got the original recipe from Peter Lester in rec.food.drink, and formatted it for my local brewfriends. Then I thought that the net at large might enjoy it, too, so here it is with some additional notes from my experience at making it.
INGREDIENTS (Makes about 2 cases)
3 U.S. gallons water
2½ oz Bullion hops
10 lbs dark malt extract
1 lb black patent malt
2 lbs crystal malt
½ lb flaked barley
¼ lb roasted barley
½ licorice stick (see note below)
1 tsp ascorbic acid
½ tsp citric acid
1 tsp Irish moss
1½ oz Golding hops
2 tsp yeast nutrient
¾ oz ale yeast (three standard packages)
PROCEDURE
(1) Combine water and Bullion hops. Boil for 20 minutes.
(2) Add dark malt extract. Boil for 20 minutes.
(3) Add black patent malt through Irish moss. Boil for 5 minutes.
(4) Remove from heat and add Golding hops. Steep for 5 minutes.
(5) Cool and add yeast nutrient and ale yeast.
(6) When fermentation has "stopped", add priming sugar and bottle.
NOTES
Lester's initial specific gravity was 1.086 and his final specific gravity was 1.020 (alcohol about 8%). His fermentation time was 11 days (a slow batch). My batch fermented in about a week (house temperature ranging between 60 and 68). It was barely drinkable after 6 weeks, but delicious after 3 months. As far as I can tell, it's still getting better (a year later), so try not to drink it all up right away.
Ingredient note: I didn't know what a "licorice stick" was, until I asked the clerk at my brewstore. The one he gave me was about 1/3 inch in diameter and 3 inches long. It was dark black, and not sweet to the taste at all. It seems to be a standard brewing ingredient. Sorry I can't be more specific about it.
RATING
Difficulty: For experienced beer brewers only. Time: 1 hour preparation, 2 weeks fermenting, 6 months aging. Precision: measure the ingredients.
CONTRIBUTOR
Spencer W. Thomas
University of Utah, Computer Science Department, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
thomas@cs.utah.edu
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